Spurs and the Great West

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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Lonnie Parker sand cast silver and turquoise bracelets. These lead blanks are original designs and have been in Lonnie's family for many decades. To make a bracelet the lead blank is pressed into a mixture of sand and oil and one Silver bracelet is produced. The bracelet though is far from complete. After the Silver bracelet is cast... slag and remnants' from the casting must be removed. The bracelet is stamped, adornments are added, a bezel is made and a beautiful, natural turquoise gemstone is added. Finally, the patina is applied, the bracelet is polished and a unique work of the silversmith's art emerges. It is important to note too, the fine stamp work you see is from handmade dies that are over 100 years old. The dies are steel and often made from old railroad spikes. Many of Lonnie's dies are family heirlooms. The dies were made by Lonnie's grandfather, Esitty Chischilly (Curly Hair Silver Smith). The turquoise Lonnie Parker uses for her jewelry is all natural turquoise and was chosen for its beauty. Many of these turquoise gemstones are quite rare and came out long closed Arizona and Nevada turquoise mines.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Kevin Burns
Kevin was born in 1962 in Borger, Texas. He started breaking horses at 13, cowboying at various ranches in the panhandle and punching cows for the Coldwater Ranch, north of Amarillo. Kevin is pretty much self-taught, crediting Jerry Cates for refining his talent. In 1982, while cowboying for the Coldwater Cattle Company, Kevin ordered a bit and a pair of spurs from Jerry Cates. Once Kevin’s order was filled by Mr. Cates, he was amazed at the talent that went along with the building of good solid using gear. Before too long, Kevin decided to spend time with Mr. Cates in his shop learning the trade of bit and spur making. Later that year, Kevin opened his door and started making custom cowboy gear on a full time basis.

Burns has a talent for implementing highly dramatic and artistic designs. Kevin is a natural artist and his overlay work is precise, detailed, powerful, and distinctive.

Burns enjoys working freehand designing flowers, leaves, and longhorn bulls. Burns pieces are highly sought after by cowboys on the ranch and collectors all over world.

Kevin is married and has a son and a daughter. He is a full-time maker; in his spare time he can be found managing his yearling cattle operation in the Texas Panhandle.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Cypremort Point State Park is a public recreation area located on Vermilion Bay, Louisiana near the end of La. Hwy. 319. It is named for nearby Cypremort Point. Cypremort means "dead cypress" in French. The 185-acre park, set against a backdrop of coastal marsh, contains a half-mile stretch of man-made beach which contains picnic sites, a fishing pavilion and sailboat launch. Also, there are 6 cabins on the park grounds which may be reserved by guests. Chitimacha tradition says that one of 4 markers for their tribal land was a great cypress, at present-day Cypremort Point State Park.Cypremort Point is one of the few spots on the Louisiana Gulf coastline which may be accessed by road.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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The Arapaho are a Native American people historically living on the plains of Colorado and Wyoming. They were close allies of the Cheyenne tribe and loosely aligned with the Lakota and Dakota.

By the 1850s, Arapaho bands formed two tribes, namely the Northern Arapaho and Southern Arapaho. Since 1878, the Northern Arapaho have lived with the Eastern Shoshone on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming and are federally recognized as the Arapahoe Tribe of the Wind River Reservation. The Southern Arapaho live with the Southern Cheyenne in Oklahoma. Together, their members are enrolled as the federally recognized Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes.

It is uncertain where the word 'Arapaho' came from. Europeans may have derived it from the Pawnee word for "trader", iriiraraapuhu, or it may have been a corruption of a Crow word for "tattoo", alapúuxaache. The Arapaho autonym is Hinono'eino or Inun-ina ("our people" or "people of our own kind"). They refer to their tribe as Hinono'eiteen (Arapaho Nation).

The Northern Arapaho, who called themselves Nank'haanseine'nan or Nookhose'iinenno ("white sage men"), were known as Baantcline'nan or Bo'oociinenno ("red willow men") to the Southern Arapaho, whereas the latter were called by their northern kin Nawathi'neha or Noowunenno' ("Southerners"). The Northern Arapaho were also known as BSakuune'na' (Bee'eekuunnenno') ("blood-soup men").

The Arapaho recognize five main divisions among their people, each speaking a different dialect and apparently representing as many originally distinct but cognate tribes. Through much of Arapaho history, each tribal nation maintained a separate ethnic identity, although they occasionally came together and acted as political allies.

The Arapaho language is currently spoken in two different dialects, and it is considered to be a member of the Algonquian language family. The number of fluent speakers of Northern Arapaho dwindles at 250, most living on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, while the number of Southern Arapaho speakers is even more scarce, only a handful of people speak it, all advanced in age.

Around 3,000 years ago, the ancestral Arapaho-speaking people (Heeteinono'eino') lived in the western Great Lakes region along the Red River Valley in what is classified as present-day Manitoba, Canada and Minnesota, United States. There the Arapaho were an agricultural people who grew crops, including maize. Following European colonization in eastern Canada, together with the early Cheyenne people, the Arapaho were forced to migrate westward onto the eastern Great Plains by the Ojibwe. They were numerous and powerful, having obtained guns from their French trading allies.

The ancestors of the Arapaho people entered the Great Plains the western Great Lakes region sometime before 1700. During their early history on the plains, the Arapaho lived on the northern plains from the South Saskatchewan River in Canada south to Montana, Wyoming, and western South Dakota. Before the Arapaho acquired horses, they used domestic dogs as pack animals to pull their travois. The Arapaho acquired horses in the early 1700s from other tribes, which changed their way of life. They became a nomadic people, using the horses as pack and riding animals. They could transport greater loads, and travel more easily by horseback to hunt more easily and widely, increasing their success in hunting on the Plains.

Gradually, the Arapaho moved farther south, split into the closely allied Northern and Southern Arapaho, and established a large joint territory spanning land in southern Montana, most of Wyoming, the Nebraska Panhandle, central and eastern Colorado, western Oklahoma, and extreme western Kansas. A large group of Arapaho split from the main tribe and became an independent people, commonly known as the Gros Ventre (as named by the French) or Atsina.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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This ponderosa pine in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Colorado has been cored by the Forest Service, and found to be over 450 years old.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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There seems to have been more than one "Choctaw Bill" in the old west. This photo is one such, taken at Mora, NM in the 1920's. Could that be a Colt Dragoon he is holding?
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Tyrell is a relatively new part-time bladesmith living in California. He got into this craft from watching Forged in Fire with his son and thought it would be a cool thing to do together. He bought a stick welder and taught himself how to weld, built a forge and then went on to building lots of tools. He even built a power hammer but it was WAY to loud so he sold it and used the proceeds to build the hydraulic press he currently has.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Nooksack Falls is a waterfall along the North Fork of the Nooksack River in Whatcom County, Washington. The water flows through a narrow valley and drops freely 88 feet into a deep rocky river canyon. The falls are viewable from the forested cover near the cliffs edge. The falls are a short 2/3 of a mile drive off the Mount Baker Highway, Washington (State Route 542). The falls were featured in the hunting scene of the movie The Deer Hunter.

Throughout the late 19th century, significant mineral discoveries were made in eastern Whatcom County and in particular the Nooksack Falls region. The richest and most significant strike was the Lone Jack Claim of 1897. Before the mine closed in 1924, approximately $500,000 worth of gold was excavated. Due to the success of the Lone Jack Claim, the area became known as the Mount Baker Mining District and produced over 5,000 claims between 1890 and 1937. One of the claims, known as the Great Excelsior Mine, was located ten miles southwest of the Lone Jack Mine and only one mile from the Nooksack Falls Powerplant. In 1902, the Excelsior Claim erected a 20-stamp mill to crush the ore and a water powered turbine provided the power. In 1914, when the Excelsior Mill was rebuilt, a power line was extended from the Nooksack Falls plant to provide electricity to the mill.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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The Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals is a non-profit museum in Hillsboro, Oregon, United States. Located just north of the Sunset Highway on the northern edge of Hillsboro, the earth science museum is in the Portland metropolitan area. Opened in 1997, the museum's collections date to the 1930s with the museum housed in a home built to display the rock and mineral collections of the museum founders. The ranch-style home is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the first of its kind listed in Oregon. In 2015 the museum became a Smithsonian Affiliate museum.

The museum sits on 23 wooded acres, with the main building containing 7,500 square feet of space. Collections include petrified wood, various fossils, fluorescent minerals, meteorites, zeolites, and a variety of other minerals. With more than 20,000 specimens, the museum is the largest of its kind in the Pacific Northwest. The facility has around 25,000 visitors each year.

Gemstones include rubies, diamonds, rhodochrosite, opal, emerald, and amethyst among others. Fossils include shark teeth, coprolites, or fossilized dung, petrified wood, dinosaur eggs, trilobites, and a baby dinosaur of the genus Psittacosaurus. One display features all 12 birthstones with a version of each in its natural state and as finished gemstones, along with the same before and after for other gemstones such as aquamarine. Around 1,000 of the specimens at the museum are only viewable using a microscope.

One gallery, the Rainbow Gallery, is designed to showcase rocks and minerals that have phosphorescent or fluorescent elements that allow them to glow in the dark. An automated system uses a lighting cycle that includes ultraviolet lights to energize the rocks.

The main rhodochrosite attraction is the "Alma Rose" from the Sweet Home Mine in Colorado. The Alma Rose includes crystals measuring up to 9.5 cm in length along with quartz and calcite highlights.[ The Rices once owned the complementary "Alma King" rhodochrosite from the same mine, but sold the piece to the Coors Brewing Company, who then donated it to the Denver Natural History Museum. The two stones had been purchased by the couple for US $800,000. Other rhodochrosite specimens include those from mines in Arizona.[ The museum also has a collection of 107 gold pieces from the F. John Barlow collection featuring items such as a 42 troy ounce leaf and pieces mined from the Ace of Diamonds mine in Liberty, Washington. One of the museum's pieces, a sperrylite from Russia, is considered one of the finest in the world.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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The Hualapai Mountains, are a mountain range in Mohave County, near Kingman in Arizona. "Hualapai" means "People of the tall Pines" in the Hualapai language.

The mountain range consists of five main peaks: Dean Peak, Getz Peak, Aspen Peak, and Hayden Peak overlooking the broad Hualapai Valley to the north toward Kingman; and the tallest, Hualapai Peak, on the south.

Hiking trails reach Aspen and Hayden Peaks. Several areas, including Getz and Hayden Peaks, are home to radio transmitter/receiver towers.

The Hualapai Mountains are covered in pine trees, namely pinyon pine. Above 5,500 feet the ponderosa pine appear. Most pine trees are found on the cooler north facing slopes. The habitat is mainly forest, and has many natural springs.

The ecology of the Hualapai Mountains is comparable to that of the San Bernardino Mountains and San Jacinto Mountains in southern California, with major forests of many conifer species, as well as aspen groves at higher elevations. The higher elevations of the Hualapai Mountains support Madrean Sky Islands habitats.

Bear, elk, mule deer, mountain lion, javelina, and other animals can be found here. Mountain lion and bear have been drawn to civilized areas like Pinion Pines and Atherton Acres due to the large deer population. There are some animals only native to the Hualapai Mountain range, including a breed of ground squirrel, and tarantula.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Forgotten western movies: Code of the Silver Sage is a 1950 American Western film directed by Fred C. Brannon and starring Allan Lane.

Arizona Territory is in the grip of outlaw terror and killer outlaws, secretly organized by Hulon Champion, who covers his power ambitions with the guise of a respectable firearms merchant. Newspaper editor Fred Gately is killed by Champion's henchman Curt Watson when Gatley makes a public appeal to the President of the United States on the front page of his Bolton City News. After his death, his daughter Ann and his assistant Nugget Clark carry on his efforts and are rewarded when they receive word that the President will journey to the territory in response to their plea. Champion immediately sets in motion a scheme to assassinate the President by putting himself in the good graces of Major Oliver Duncan who is to facilitate the trip. Champion's henchmen intercept and wipe out the detail led by Lt. John Case, Ann's sweetheart, who is bearing sealed orders regarding the trip. He pins suspicion on Case. Rocky Lane, a lieutenant in the U.S. Cavalry Intelligence, working incognito, is riding to deliver a map of the secret route and is attacked by Watson, but escapes. Rocky then begins to uncover Champion's trail of deceit and villainy, but Champion is still loose to make an attempt on the President's life.

Allan Lane as Lieutenant Rocky Lane
Eddy Waller as Nugget Clark
Roy Barcroft as Hulon Champion
Kay Christopher as Ann Gately
Lane Bradford as Henchman Watson
William Ruhl as Major Duncan
Richard Emory as Lieutenant John Case
Kenne Duncan as Henchman Dick Cantwell
Rex Lease as Captain Mathews
Hank Patterson as Sergeant Woods
John Butler as Charley Speed
Forrest Taylor as Rancher Sandy
Black Jack as Rocky's Horse
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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A Fine Silver Mounted Maximilian Period Charro Saddle. Incredible silver mounted Mexican saddle, circa 1860. The huge and impressive 8 1/2" silver repousse horn with flowering basket and rope edge leads to the 12" seat and the silver bound cantle. Lion head decoration and ring holders along the side, silver covered stirrups, bindings and rigging rings. The saddle was brought to Europe by a French officer after the defeat at the Siege of Queretaro in 1867. It was this battle that ultimately led to the end of Maximilian’s rule and his life.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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John Coffee "Jack" Hays (January 28, 1817 – April 21, 1883) was an American military officer. A captain in the Texas Rangers and a military officer of the Republic of Texas, Hays served in several armed conflicts from 1836 to 1848, including against the Comanche Empire in Texas and during the Mexican–American War.

Jack Hays was born at Little Cedar Lick, Wilson County, Tennessee. His father Harmon A. Hays fought in the War of 1812, naming his son for a relative by marriage, Colonel John Coffee.

In 1836, at the age of 19, Jack Hays migrated to the Republic of Texas. Sam Houston appointed him as a member of a company of Texas Rangers because he knew the Hays family from his Tennessee years. He met with Houston and delivered a letter of recommendation from then-President Andrew Jackson, his great uncle.

In the following years, Hays led the Rangers on a campaign against the Comanche in Texas, and succeeded in weakening their power. He rode with a Lipan Chief named Flacco who led the charge into every battle with him. The duo led and inspired the Rangers. In 1840 Tonkawa Chief Placido and 13 scouts joined with the Rangers to track down a large Comanche war party, culminating at the Battle of Plum Creek.

Later, Hays commanded the force against the invasion from Mexico of 1842. During the Mexican–American War (1846–1848), Hays commanded the First Regiment of Texas Rangers at the Battle of Monterrey, established six companies along the northern and western frontier of Texas. He then commanded the Second Regiment of Texas Rangers in Winfield Scott's Mexico City campaign. Later, while fighting under Gen. Joseph Lane, who was defending the American line of communications with Vera Cruz, Hays defeated superior numbers of Mexican cavalry at the Affair at Galaxara Pass and Mexican guerillas in the Skirmish at Matamoros and the action of Sequalteplan. The Rangers excelled during this conflict, gaining nationwide fame. Hays was the first to use the Navy Colt Paterson five shot revolver. He expedited Samuel Walker to meet with Samuel Colt which led to the design of the legendary Colt Walker six shot revolver used in the Old West.

The Comanche had great admiration for Hays. Upon the birth of Hays' first son in California, Chief Buffalo Hump sent the Hays family a gift, a golden spoon engraved "Buffalo Hump Jr."

In 1849, Hays was appointed by the United States government as the US Indian agent for the Gila River country in New Mexico and Arizona.

The same year the Hays joined the migration to California, leading a party of Forty Niners from New York that traveled in wagons to California from Texas. This party pioneered a shortcut on Cooke's Wagon Road that saved a long journey to the south. That improved route became known as the Tucson Cutoff. Hays was elected sheriff of San Francisco County in 1850, and later became active in politics. In 1853, he was appointed US surveyor-general for California.

Hays was one of the earliest residents of the city of Oakland. In the following years, he amassed a considerable fortune through real estate and ranching enterprises. In 1860, while in Virginia City, Nevada, on business, he heard the news of the First Battle of Pyramid Lake. He commanded a force of volunteer soldiers at the Second Battle of Pyramid Lake.

During the Civil War, Hays retired from military involvement.

In 1876, Hays was elected as a delegate to the Democratic Party national convention, which nominated Samuel J. Tilden for the presidency of the United States.

Jack Hays died in California on April 21, 1883, and his remains were interred at Mountain View Cemetery in Oakland.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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Benitoite is one of the world’s rarest gemstones and possesses many unique qualities compared to other gems. It has a high index of refraction and a dispersive power that is higher than diamond, making the stone extraordinarily bright and fiery when cut. Its color is usually a medium blue/violet, but can range from colorless to dark blue.

Benitoite has been confirmed from several locations around the world, but gem quality crystals have only been found at the historic Dallas claim (popularly known as the “Benitoite Gem mine”) and the nearby Junnila claim, both located in the New Idria district, San Benito County, California. In 1985, the State of California officially named benitoite the State Gemstone.

The Benitoite Gem mine is located on a small mining claim in San Benito County, California, about halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco. Access to the mine is via either a roughly sealed trail that is privately controlled or by two alternate dirt roads that approach from the west and north of the gem mine. General approaches to the local roads is either to the northwest from Coalinga, southeast from Paicines, or northeast from King City. This area of the coastal range is sparsely populated and there are no facilities within miles of the Benitoite Gem mine.

A prospector, James Couch, was grubstaked by Roderick Dallas, and in February, 1907, and on his way to investigate some intriguing outcrops, found a small area littered with blue crystals which he thought might be blue sapphires. He collected several and rushed back to Coalinga. A claim was placed which was named the Dallas Gem mine. Dr. George Louderback, a professor of mineralogy at the University of California, Berkeley, was provided some of the stones. Dr. Louderback soon realized that they were not sapphires or spinel as some thought, but a new mineral not known to science. In July 1907 he published an article, naming the new mineral benitoite, named after San Benito County. The black mineral associated with the benitoite was initially called ‘carlosite’, named after the nearby San Carlos peak. However, he later discovered that this mineral was neptunite which had been discovered in Greenland in 1893.

When word got out of the new discovery, several people, including Dr. George Kunz from Tiffany’s of New York, rushed to the site to secure an exclusive marketing agreement with the miners. Mr. G. Eacret, of Shreve and Company in San Francisco won the marketing rights.

The mine owner, Mr. R.W. Dallas, built a mine camp and immediately expanded mining operations. The mine produced benitoite from an open cut in the hillside, as well as a short underground tunnel pushed into an outcrop of benitoite-bearing material called blueschist. For about 5 years, the blueschist layer yielded thousands of excellent gemstones.
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Re: Spurs and the Great West

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25 different types of old horseshoes.
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