Value of 1869 Springfield Trapdoor with Stock Repair

Post Reply
concretus
Registered User
Registered User
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Jun 08, 2017 9:30 am
Age: 54
Location: Cocoa, Florida

Value of 1869 Springfield Trapdoor with Stock Repair

Post by concretus »

Hello,

Maybe you all can help and input is greatly appreciated. I'm in the middle of negotiating a trade involving a 1869 Springfield Trapdoor in 50/70. Upon receiving the rifle to examine, I found where the stock had been cracked at the wrist and has been repaired. The individual who owns the rifle and never fired it was unaware of the repair and at first look, you would never know. The repair looks good but i don't see if there was a pin(s) installed to reinforce it. The rest of the rifle is in very good condition, the metal is in the white, bore is shiny with sharp rifling. Considering what the NRA appraisal for this rifle in very good condition. Is there a percentage value deducted due to the cracked/repaired stock? Thanks
72 usmc
Gun Junkie
Gun Junkie
Posts: 2989
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2017 10:28 pm
Age: 68
Location: Menomonee Falls, Wi

Re: Value of 1869 Springfield Trapdoor with Stock Repair

Post by 72 usmc »

I do not understand what you have but, if it is a true Model 1869 Cadet Rifle, single shot, tap door rifle chambered in 50 caliber then the current book price is approximately: Fair $500, good $1500, and very good $3250. These are retail prices. See page 418, in Peterson's book: The Standard Catalog of Military Firearms, 9th edition, 2020.
see https://www.trapdoorcollector.com//m69.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Springfield_Model_1869

Note a cracked stock puts a rifle down to good, if not fair. A repair is a repair, and how well is it done??? A wrist crack is pretty nasty. Do you want to shoot it or hang it on a wall?

It is a rather rare rifle. Picture of the rifle would help. What does metal look like and is the crack all the way through and glued or internally pinned together or was it just half way cracked? Need photos and details.
Note this guide does not use NRA descriptions. It sounds more like" good" condition at best.

Has the metal or wood finish original, or has it been altered, buffed, or polished, Stock finish is original with its patina or refinished?
See the book's descriptions and do a best guess. If less than 50%, but still original and a cracked stock that has not been refinished; well, I'd go down 40% because I am cheep and cash is tight. If a non shooter, i'd pay wall hanger price.

If I had excess money for play, a good job, younger, and really wanted it, then I'd pay up. Many of my guns are not for sale. I do not want to take a 50% loss on book retail value. But to some $1000, is like a 100 bill. In two cases, I let stuff go because it was a crazy, more than fat offer by 2 or 3x the value. They had the money I needed, and they really, really want a gun I had. Better for it to go too someone that loves something more than me.

Only you can be the judge of what you feel is a fair price. Sight unseen, if it is a Cadet model, I'd say between fair and good= $500 to $1500. Maybe offer $800 to a 1000 if all original with just a minor crack. A wrist crack =Better yet, offer $600, and see what sticks :lol: EXPECT the repair to fail. What are you willing to pay, how bad do you want it, and why? Always buy the best condition you can afford. This sounds like you are entering the world of wall hanger condition.

Be sure of the model. Be sure the metal is not buffed or the stock refinished. However, all conjecture till we see detailed photos. On most military surplus with a cracked stock, I would devalue the rifle by the cost of a replacement stock. On a CW piece that has a special stock. You will not find an original replacement on such a rare bird, so it is whatever the buyer and seller can both feel good with price wise. If both feel they are getting a good deal; then it is a good sale.

Consider the price on a quality reproduction trap door: https://www.uberti-usa.com/springfield- ... nd-carbine
Then $1000 looks like a deal. :lol: :lol:
Last edited by 72 usmc on Fri Nov 20, 2020 9:50 pm, edited 7 times in total.
To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.
72 usmc
Gun Junkie
Gun Junkie
Posts: 2989
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2017 10:28 pm
Age: 68
Location: Menomonee Falls, Wi

Re: Value of 1869 Springfield Trapdoor with Stock Repair

Post by 72 usmc »

Here are the differences in condition descriptions NRA VS P. Peterson.

http://www.surplusrifleforum.org/viewto ... =52&t=4058

From the Peterson guide:
Very Good
Firearms in this category are also sought after both by the collector and shooter. Modern firearms must be in working order and retain approximately 92 percent original metal and wood finish. lt must be 100 percent factory original, but may have some small repairs, alterations, non-factor additions. No refinishing permitted in this category. Antique firearms must have 80 percent original finish with no repairs.

Good
Modern firearms in this category may not be considered to be as collectable as the previous grades, but antique firearms are considered desirable. modern firearms must retain at least 80 percent metal and wood finish,but may display evidence of old refinishing. Small repairs, alterations, or non-factory additions are sometimes encountered in this class. Factory replacement parts are permitted. The overall working condition of the firearm must
be good as well as safe.The bore may exhibit wear or some corrosion, especially antique arms. Antique firearms may be included in this category if their metal and wood finish is at least 50 percent original factory finish.

Fair
Firearms in this category should be in satisfactory working order and safe to shoot. The overall metal and wood finish on
the modern firearm must be at least 30 percent and antique firearms must have at least some original finish or old refinish remaining. Repairs, alterations, non factory additions, and recent refinishing would all place a firearm in this classification. However, the modern firearm must be in working condition, while the antique firearm may not function. In either case, the firearm must be considered safe to fire in a working state.

Poor
Neither collectors nor shooters are likely to exhibit much interest in firearms in this condition. Modern firearms are likely to retain little metal or wood finish. Pitting and rust will be seen in firearms in this category. Modern firearms may not be in working order and may not be safeto shoot. Repairs and refinishing would be necessary to restore the firearm to safe working order. Antique firearms will have no finish and will not function. In the case of modern firearms their principal value lies in spare parts. On the other hand, antique firearms in this condition may be used as "wall hangers" or as an example of an extremely rare variation or have some kind of historical significance.
To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.
72 usmc
Gun Junkie
Gun Junkie
Posts: 2989
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2017 10:28 pm
Age: 68
Location: Menomonee Falls, Wi

Re: Value of 1869 Springfield Trapdoor with Stock Repair

Post by 72 usmc »

Here is a lateral crack not broken in half and a repair.
SEE https://www.northeastshooters.com/xen/t ... ep.295364/
One of my old posts:
viewtopic.php?f=61&t=2878

also see https://www.mandarinmansion.com/article ... oken-wrist


also a drastic crack: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CuQxjCI8OdQ

https://www.gun-tests.com/uncategorized ... ck-repair/

https://www.muzzleloadingforum.com/thre ... air.87322/

So how was the repair done? How is it cracked? Some ideas if you have to redo a repair.
To old to fight and to old to run, a Jar head will just shoot and be done with you.
Post Reply

Return to “Antique Cartridge and Black Powder Rifles”