Spurs and the Great West

User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 2044
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

The Franklin Mountains of Texas (previously known as Las Sierras de los Mansos[ are a small range (23 miles long, 3 miles wide) that extend from El Paso, Texas north into New Mexico. The Franklins were formed due to crustal extension related to the Cenozoic Rio Grande rift. Although the present topography of the range and adjoining basins is controlled by extension during rifting in the last 10 million years, faults within the range also record deformation during the Laramide orogeny, between 85 and 45 million years ago.

The highest peak is North Franklin Peak at 7,192 feet. Much of the range is part of the Franklin Mountains State Park. The mountains are composed primarily of sedimentary rock with some igneous intrusions. Geologists refer to them as tilted-block fault mountains and in them can be found 1.25 billion-year-old Precambrian rocks, the oldest in Texas.
Attachments
270px-El_Paso_Franklin_Mountains_and_Scenic_Drive_aerial.jpg
270px-El_Paso_Franklin_Mountains_and_Scenic_Drive_aerial.jpg (31.14 KiB) Viewed 370 times
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 2044
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

The Palouse Falls lie on the Palouse River, about 4 mi upstream of the confluence with the Snake River in southeast Washington.
The falls are 198 ft in height. They consist of an upper fall with a drop around 20 ft, which lies 1,000 ft north-northwest of the main drop, and a lower fall, with a drop of 198 ft.

The canyon at the falls is 377 ft deep, exposing a large cross-section of the Columbia River Basalt Group. These falls and the canyon downstream are an important feature of the channeled scablands created by the great Missoula floods that swept periodically across eastern Washington and across the Columbia River Plateau during the Pleistocene epoch.

The ancestral Palouse River flowed through the currently dry Washtucna Coulee to the Columbia River. The Palouse Falls and surrounding canyons were created when the Missoula floods overtopped the south valley wall of the ancestral Palouse River, diverting it to the current course to the Snake River by erosion of a new channel.

The area is characterized by interconnected and hanging flood-created coulees, cataracts, plunge pools, potholes, rock benches, buttes, and pinnacles typical of scablands. Palouse Falls State Park is located at the falls, protecting this part of the uniquely scenic area.
Attachments
Palouse_Falls.jpg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 2044
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

J.J. Estrada
Born:1831
Died:1900
Maker's Mark: "J J Estrada" engraved in silverwork
J.J. Estrada was born in Mexico and later immigrated to the US where he worked as a blacksmith and bit and spur maker in Los Angeles and San Luis Obispo. He was married and had two sons, Juan and Francisco. Francisco would apprentice with J.J. and become a bit and spur maker in his own right later. J.J. Estrada marked his pieces with an engraved script on the outside of the bit, he typically worked with inlay silver and had a style that was completely different from his son. These pieces are quite rare and hard to find.
Attachments
j.j. estrada.jpg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 2044
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Jump Creek Falls is a waterfall in Owyhee County in the U.S. state of Idaho, just to the southwest of the city of Marsing.

The falls are accessible by a short, ​1⁄4-mile hike from a lower parking lot, while an upper parking lot offers several trails that explore the falls and surrounding areas.
Attachments
Jumpcreek.jpg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 2044
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Banner Creek Summit is a mountain pass in central Idaho, at an elevation of 7,037 feet above sea level on State Highway 21, the Ponderosa Pine Scenic Byway. It is located on the border of Custer County and Boise County, also the border of the Challis and Boise National Forests, immediately northwest of the Sawtooth Range.

Banner Creek Summit also marks the divide between the Salmon River and Payette River drainage areas. The highway follows Banner Creek, a tributary of the Middle Fork of the Salmon River, on the north side of the summit, and Canyon Creek (South Fork - Payette River) on the south side.

In road distance, the summit is about midway between Stanley and Lowman. This section of SH-21 is usually not maintained during the winter months, due to light traffic and heavy snowfall.
Attachments
Banner Creek Summit0.jpg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 2044
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Here's a nice Navajo silver and turquoise pendant
.
Attachments
Pendant.jpg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 2044
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

The Organ Mountains–Desert Peaks National Monument is a United States National Monument in the state of New Mexico, managed by the Bureau of Land Management as part of the National Landscape Conservation System.

The 496,330-acre monument is located in the Mesilla Valley in southern New Mexico, surrounding the city of Las Cruces in Doña Ana County. The protected area includes several mountain ranges of the Chihuahuan Desert. The five identified as being within the national monument are the Robledo Mountains, Sierra de las Uvas, Doña Ana Mountains, Organ Mountains and Potrillo Mountains. The Prehistoric Trackways National Monument is nearby. The monument protects a large variety of geological, paleontological and archaeological resources.

President Barack Obama designated the monument on May 21, 2014. Half of the monument is designated wilderness and closed to development or motorized use.

Organ Mountains–Desert Peaks protects many archaeological and cultural sites of interest. Before the Gadsden Purchase of 1853, this land included the border between Mexico and the United States. The Aden Lava Flow Wilderness Study Area is here and there are 243 known archaeological sites within the monument, including some of the earliest Native American settlements and petroglyphs known from three different tribes. The land also includes Shelter Cave and Conkling Cavern. Fossils of ground sloths have been found in the area.

More recently the land was used by William H. Bonney, better known as the outlaw Billy the Kid, and Geronimo, a leader during the Apache Wars, both of whom lived in various parts of New Mexico in the 19th century. It is said that Billy the Kid visited "Outlaw Rock", and there is a cave known as "Geronimo's Rock". The monument also includes 22 miles of the historic Butterfield Stagecoach Trail.

The monument includes sites where World War II bombers practiced their targeting, as well as Kilbourne Hole in the Potrillo volcanic field, where American astronauts trained for lunar missions in the 1960s.
Attachments
Organ_Mountains.jpg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 2044
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Bill Downing a.k.a. William F. Downing (1860 – August 5, 1908) was a notorious outlaw during the Wild West era in Arizona. Downing had fled from the Texas Rangers posse that was after him when he came to Arizona. In Arizona, he was involved in the killing of William S. “Slim” Traynor and in various train robberies including the robbery of the Train Depot in the town of Cochise. Downing was so unpopular that even members of his gang couldn't stand him.

Downing was born in Texas. He was in trouble with the law when he came to Arizona Territory, with a Texas Rangers posse in pursuit. Allegedly his real name was Frank Jackson, a teenager who was a member of the Sam Bass gang. Jackson had been involved in a shoot-out at Round Rock, Texas between the Bass gang and the Texas Rangers in July, 1878. Jackson was shot in one leg, but survived. The posse killed Bass, however Jackson escaped and rode through New Mexico until he reached Arizona where he assumed the name William F. Downing. Once he settled down, he sent for his wife, Linda Downing, who was also a native of Texas. Downing never spoke about his relationship with the Bass gang.

He and his wife settled near the small Sulphur Springs Valley mining town of Pearce. Downing worked as a cowhand at nearby ranches. He was hired to work in the Esperanza Ranch, which was known for hiring rustlers, outlaws and renegade Apaches. Though Downing became known for his quarrelsome nature, he was also known to be less quarrelsome when he was drinking whiskey.
Attachments
Bill_Downing.jpg
Bill_Downing.jpg (14.27 KiB) Viewed 233 times
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 2044
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

The Ouachita River is a 605-mile-long river that runs south and east through the U.S. states of Arkansas and Louisiana, joining the Tensas River to form the Black River near Jonesville, Louisiana. It is the 25th-longest river in the United States (by main stem).

The river is named for the Ouachita tribe, one of several historic tribes who lived along it. Others included the Caddo, Osage Nation, Tensa, Chickasaw, and Choctaw. The historian Muriel Hazel Wright suggested that word Ouachita owa chito is a Choctaw phrase meaning "hunt big" or "good hunting grounds".

Before the rise of the historic tribes, their indigenous ancestors lived along the river for thousands of years. In the Lower Mississippi Valley, they began building monumental earthwork mounds in the Middle Archaic period (6000–2000 BC in Louisiana). The earliest construction was Watson Brake, an 11-mound complex built about 3500 BC by hunter gatherers in present-day Louisiana. The discovery and dating of several such early sites in northern Louisiana has changed the traditional model, which associated mound building with sedentary, agricultural societies, but these cultures did not develop for thousands of years.

The largest such prehistoric mound was destroyed in the 20th century during construction of a bridge at Jonesville, Louisiana. Likely built by the Mississippian culture, which rose about 1000 AD on the Mississippi and its tributaries, this mound was reported in use as late as 1540 by the Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto. On his expedition through this area, he encountered Indians occupying the site. A lightning strike destroyed the temple on the mound that year, which was seen as a bad omen by the tribe. They never rebuilt the temple, and were recorded as abandoning the site in 1736.

During the late 1700s, when the area was controlled by the Spanish and French, the river served as a route for early colonists, and for land speculators such as the self-styled Baron de Bastrop. The "Bastrop lands" later passed into the hands of another speculator, former Vice President Aaron Burr. He saw potential for big profits in the event of a war with Spain following the Louisiana Purchase. Burr and many of his associates were arrested for treason, before their band of armed settlers reached the Ouachita.

During the 1830s, the Ouachita River Valley attracted land speculators from New York and southeastern cities. Its rich soil and accessibility due to the country's elaborate river steamboat network made it desirable. Developers cultivated land for large cotton plantations; dependent on slave labor, cotton production supported new planter wealth in the ante-bellum years. Steamboats ran scheduled trips between Camden, Arkansas and New Orleans, for example. A person could travel from any eastern city to the Ouachita River without touching land, except to transfer from one steamboat to another.

One of the investors from the east was Meriwether Lewis Randolph, the youngest grandson of Thomas Jefferson. He was building a home on the Ouachita River in what is now Clark County, Arkansas, when he died of malaria in 1837. He had been appointed Secretary of the Arkansas Territory by President Andrew Jackson in 1835, and had relinquished his commission when Arkansas became a state in 1836.

Skirmishes took place near the Ouachita River during the American Civil War. On September 1, 1863, forces of the Seventeenth Wisconsin led by Brig. Gen. M. M. Crocker crossed from Natchez, Mississippi to Vidalia, the seat of Concordia Parish, and moved toward the lower Ouachita in the section called the Black River. That night the Confederate steamer Rinaldo was captured by Union forces after a short artillery duel and was destroyed. Crocker fought with the few troops stationed on the Black River and moved toward Harrisonburg, seat of Catahoula Parish.
Attachments
Ouachita_River,_Arkansas.jpg
Ouachita_River,_Arkansas.jpg (16.09 KiB) Viewed 207 times
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 2044
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Aztec Land and Cattle Company, Limited ("Aztec") is a land company with a historic presence in Arizona. It was formed in 1884 and incorporated in early 1885 as a cattle ranching operation that purchased 1,000,000 acres in northern Arizona from the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad. It then imported approximately 32,000 head of cattle from Texas and commenced ranching operations in Arizona. Because Aztec's brand was the Hashknife, a saddler's knife used on early day ranches, the company was known more famously as The Hashknife Outfit.
Attachments
Hashknife_cowboys_Holbrook_Arizona_circa_1900.jpg
Hashknife_cowboys_Holbrook_Arizona_circa_1900.jpg (30.88 KiB) Viewed 191 times
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 2044
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

The Bear Lodge Mountains are a small mountain range in Crook County, Wyoming. These mountains are protected in the Black Hills National Forest as part of its Bearlodge District. Devils Tower National Monument was the first U.S. National Monument and draws about 400,000 visitors per year to the area. The Bear Lodge Mountains are one of three mountain ranges that comprise the Black Hills region and national forest, including the Black Hills itself and South Dakota's Elk Mountains.

Sundance, Wyoming is the closest major city and lies south of the Bear Lodge Mountains. Wyoming Highway 24 (the Bear Lodge Highway) passes through the northern part of the range.

The place names Bear Lodge, Sun Dance, and Rock Gatherer (Inyan Kara) come from the history of Lakota people in this area. Devils Tower was declared a United States National Monument in 1906. From 1907 to 1908, the area was the Bear Lodge National Forest, then the Sundance National Forest through 1915, before becoming a district of the Black Hills National Forest.

The Bear Lodge Mountains were formed as a byproduct of the geological processes that created the Black Hills, and offer hikes throughout bottomlands, hills, and buttes. Unlike the Black Hills, this range is small and only a few igneous rocks are exposed. Just outside the range, however, lie the very large igneous intrusions of Devils Tower, Inyan Kara Mountain, and Sundance Mountain.

Bounded on the north by the Belle Fourche River, the mountains have several Belle Fourche River tributaries including Redwater, Blacktail, Miller, Beaver, Lytle, Lame Jones, and Hay Creeks. There were coal mines in these river valleys

While ponderosa pine and mixed-grass prairie grow on the highland of this range, its ravines offer habitat to species such as wild rose, skunkbush sumac, and chokecherry. At the foot of the mountains grow bur oak. Groves of aspen frequently separate meadows with fine soil from ponderosa pine forests growing in coarse soil. Vegetation in the Bear Lodge Mountains is similar to that of the Black Hills, although the Bear Lodge Mountains have no white spruce. The mountains' growing season is long, and forest growth in this range and the Black Hills is high. This productivity has led to high levels of logging.
Attachments
Devils_Tower_aerial.jpg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 2044
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

In the days before carbide lamps became available, miners used oil lamps, little metal lamps shaped like miniature teapots. These had a bundle of candle wicks in the spout and hook on the rear that could be hung in the band of a miner's felt hat (plastic or fiberglas hard hats came later.) These lamps burned something called "sunshine oil" a mixture of mineral oil and beeswax that was solid when cold and liquid when heated. However, this was too pricey for most miners so they burned the grease that the mine supplied for the ore car wheels.
Attachments
s-l500.jpg
s-l500.jpg (28.83 KiB) Viewed 134 times
miners-lamp-patent-1879.jpg
oil21.jpg
oil21.jpg (13.91 KiB) Viewed 135 times
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 2044
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Juan Estrada
Born:1865
Died:1942
Maker's Mark: "J" or "JE" stamped into work done for Garcia, Goldberg, or Staunton Saddlery Companies
Juan moved to the US with his father J.J. and learned the trade of bit and spur making from him. He eventually moved to Elko, Nev and worked for G.S. Garcia where he learned the engraving style used by Garcia and others at the shop. He worked in Nevada for around 25 years doing work first for Garcia, and then for M.B. Staunton and later Goldberg-Staunton in Winnemucca. He moved back to California and eventually ended up in San Francisco where he partnered with Filo Gutierrez and the two produced their own bits and spurs. His pieces are often marked for other makers such as Garcia (where he also was allowed to stamp a J in addition to the normal markings), Gus Goldberg (he stamped JE in addition to the Goldberg marks), or other makers where he would also leave a JE mark. The items from his partnership with Gutierrez are marked GUTIERREZ & ESTRADA.
Attachments
86270424_1_x.jpg
86270424_1_x.jpg (16.23 KiB) Viewed 106 times
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 2044
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

Forgotten western movies
Barricade is a 1950 American Technicolor Western film directed by Peter Godfrey and written by William Sackheim. The film stars Dane Clark, Raymond Massey, Ruth Roman, Robert Douglas, Morgan Farley and Walter Coy. The film was released by Warner Bros. on March 18, 1950.

Gold-mine operator "Boss" Kruger (Raymond Massey) has certainly earned his nickname. A frontier dictator, Kruger runs his mine like a prison colony. Most of his workers are, in fact, fugitives from justice and are given dubious "protection" by Kruger. Two of the laborers are Judith Burns (Ruth Roman) and Bob Peters (Dane Clark), both on the lam from the law. Judith and Bob befriend lawyer Aubrey Milburn (Robert Douglas), who seeks to prove that Kruger is a murderer.

Dane Clark as Bob Peters
Raymond Massey as Boss Kruger
Ruth Roman as Judith Burns
Robert Douglas as Aubrey Milburn
Morgan Farley as The Judge
Walter Coy as Benson
George Stern as Tippy
Robert Griffin as Kirby
Frank Marlowe as Brandy
Tony Martínez as Peso
Attachments
unnamed.jpg
image.jpg
User avatar
nrobertb
Firearm Fanatic
Firearm Fanatic
Posts: 2044
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:02 am
Location: NW Lower MI

Re: Spurs and the Great West

Post by nrobertb »

All stagecoach riders paid a price in physical discomfort, lack of sleep, bad food and unfriendly elements. As far as fare went, short trips charged 10 to 15 cents per mile. The cost for the 2,812-mile journey from Tipton, Missouri, to San Francisco, California, was $200, and that didn't cover the $1 meals. And that didn't take into account the price of getting robbed.
Attachments
Stagecoach-Robbery-1.jpg
Post Reply

Return to “General Off Topic”